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INSTALLATION OF HARDWOOD FLOORS IN LOS ANGELES AREA (insurance claims $95 processing fee)

  1. Cover the subfloor with a layer of 15-pound asphalt felt, overlapping seams by about 3 inches. Tack down with a staple gun.
    Measure the room’s width at two or more points to establish an accurate centerline, and snap a chalk line parallel to your starting wall. Working from the joist marks along the walls, snap chalk lines to mark the locations of the support members.
  2. To indicate the edge of the first row of flooring, snap another chalk line about 1/2 inch from the starting wall exactly parallel to your centerline. This 1/2-inch gap between theflooring and the wall will allow for expansion; it will be covered by base shoe or baseboard molding.
  3. When installing/installation the second row and every row thereafter, move a short piece of flooring along the edge and give it a sharp rap with a mallet to tighten the new row against the previous row before nailing. If you are installing flooring over a large area, use a flooring nailer once you have installed the first three rows. Slip it onto the boards tongue and, using a heavy rubber mallet, strike the plunger to drive the 2 inch nails or staples through the tongue into each joist and into the subfloor midway between joists. Be careful to avoid scratching or otherwise damaging the flooring. Remember that end joints in two adjacent rows should not be closer than 6 inches; end joints should also not line up over a joint in the subfloor. If you are installing a wide-plank floor, some manufacturers recommend leaving a crack the width of a putty knife blade between planks for expansion. When you reach the final row, use a block and a pry bar to wedge the last boards tightly into position. drill holes and face nail boards where base shoe or baseboard molding will cover, using the reference marks along the wall to locate the joists. Set the nailheads below the surface using a hammer and nail set.  If your new floor will cause a change of level to a hallway or adjoining room, install a reducer strip for a smoth transition. This strip, milled with a rounded or beveled top, fits onto the tongue of an adjacent board or the ends of perpendicular boards. It can also be butted against the edges or ends of grooves. Face-nail the reducer strip at the edge of the floor, set the nailheads below th surface, and fill with wood putty. Last, reinstall the base shoe or baseboard molding,
  4. The finished wear layers of pre-finished hardwood floors arefar superior to any finish that can be applied during the
    construction of your new home, or the remodel of your existing home. Factory applied finish coats are more resistant to abrasion, and will not show swirl marks, hairs, dust, and other imperfections often associated with “from scratch” hardwood flooring.
  1. Rent a floor sander from an equipment rental shop. Traditional drum sanders do a good job but are quite heavy and take some getting used to. (It’s important to keep a drum sander moving all the time. They work fast and if left standing in one spot can quickly sand a groove in the floor that would be impossible to remove.)
  2. Get a good supply of sandpaper (in a range of grits–—36, 60, 80, 100) that will fit your rental machine. Many rental outlets will take back sandpaper you don’t use. Ask about it.
  3. Clip the heaviest-grit sandpaper (36 grit) into the sander.
  4. Run the sander over the floor in the direction of the wood grain. Push or pull the sander in straight, even strokes. Don’t sand across the grain.
  5. Remember to keep the machine in motion while it’s turned on. If you gouge the floor a little while sanding, go over it again with the sander in several long strokes to even it out.
  6. Remove the heavy-grit sandpaper when the whole floor is sanded, and clip a lighter-grain sandpaper (60 grit) into the sander. Sand scratches and lines in the floor as many times as necessary to remove them.
  7. Go over the floor again with the next lighter grain sandpaper. The key to getting beautiful smooth floors is to move up the grits sequentially from 36 to 60 to 80 to 100.
  8. Repeat steps 3 through 10 with an edging machine if your floor sander doesn’t reach the edge of the floor. (These can also be found at your rental center.)
hardwood-refinishing
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hardwood-refinishing5

INSTALLATION OF HARDWOOD FLOORS IN LOS ANGELES AREA (insurance claims $95 processing fee)

  1. Cover the subfloor with a layer of 15-pound asphalt felt, overlapping seams by about 3 inches. Tack down with a staple gun.
    Measure the room’s width at two or more points to establish an accurate centerline, and snap a chalk line parallel to your starting wall. Working from the joist marks along the walls, snap chalk lines to mark the locations of the support members.
  2. To indicate the edge of the first row of flooring, snap another chalk line about 1/2 inch from the starting wall exactly parallel to your centerline. This 1/2-inch gap between theflooring and the wall will allow for expansion; it will be covered by base shoe or baseboard molding.
  3. When installing/installation the second row and every row thereafter, move a short piece of flooring along the edge and give it a sharp rap with a mallet to tighten the new row against the previous row before nailing. If you are installing flooring over a large area, use a flooring nailer once you have installed the first three rows. Slip it onto the boards tongue and, using a heavy rubber mallet, strike the plunger to drive the 2 inch nails or staples through the tongue into each joist and into the subfloor midway between joists. Be careful to avoid scratching or otherwise damaging the flooring. Remember that end joints in two adjacent rows should not be closer than 6 inches; end joints should also not line up over a joint in the subfloor. If you are installing a wide-plank floor, some manufacturers recommend leaving a crack the width of a putty knife blade between planks for expansion. When you reach the final row, use a block and a pry bar to wedge the last boards tightly into position. drill holes and face nail boards where base shoe or baseboard molding will cover, using the reference marks along the wall to locate the joists. Set the nailheads below the surface using a hammer and nail set.  If your new floor will cause a change of level to a hallway or adjoining room, install a reducer strip for a smoth transition. This strip, milled with a rounded or beveled top, fits onto the tongue of an adjacent board or the ends of perpendicular boards. It can also be butted against the edges or ends of grooves. Face-nail the reducer strip at the edge of the floor, set the nailheads below th surface, and fill with wood putty. Last, reinstall the base shoe or baseboard molding,
  4. The finished wear layers of pre-finished hardwood floors arefar superior to any finish that can be applied during the
    construction of your new home, or the remodel of your existing home. Factory applied finish coats are more resistant to abrasion, and will not show swirl marks, hairs, dust, and other imperfections often associated with “from scratch” hardwood flooring.
  1. Rent a floor sander from an equipment rental shop. Traditional drum sanders do a good job but are quite heavy and take some getting used to. (It’s important to keep a drum sander moving all the time. They work fast and if left standing in one spot can quickly sand a groove in the floor that would be impossible to remove.)
  2. Get a good supply of sandpaper (in a range of grits–—36, 60, 80, 100) that will fit your rental machine. Many rental outlets will take back sandpaper you don’t use. Ask about it.
  3. Clip the heaviest-grit sandpaper (36 grit) into the sander.
  4. Run the sander over the floor in the direction of the wood grain. Push or pull the sander in straight, even strokes. Don’t sand across the grain.
  5. Remember to keep the machine in motion while it’s turned on. If you gouge the floor a little while sanding, go over it again with the sander in several long strokes to even it out.
  6. Remove the heavy-grit sandpaper when the whole floor is sanded, and clip a lighter-grain sandpaper (60 grit) into the sander. Sand scratches and lines in the floor as many times as necessary to remove them.
  7. Go over the floor again with the next lighter grain sandpaper. The key to getting beautiful smooth floors is to move up the grits sequentially from 36 to 60 to 80 to 100.
  8. Repeat steps 3 through 10 with an edging machine if your floor sander doesn’t reach the edge of the floor. (These can also be found at your rental center.)
hardwood-refinishing
hardwood-refinishing1
hardwood-refinishing3
hardwood-refinishing4
hardwood-refinishing5